CADENCE Defense Industry Manufacturing Internships will be Offered at Sierra College

Sierra College was selected to participate in the Governor’s Office Department of Defense (DoD) CADENCE grant student internship project. CADENCE project activities will focus on supporting California suppliers in the defense innovation and manufacturing base that are involved in the advancement of specific key technologies or supply chains including microelectronics, fifth-generation (5G) wireless technology, cyber, space, artificial intelligence, and fully networked command, control and communications (FNC3).

Defense manufacturing community consortium firms will benefit from access to a pipeline of talent to meet their workforce needs. CADENCE includes 15 project components executed by a consortium comprised of community, industry, state agencies, and educational institutions. This will provide an experiential learning opportunity where students can benefit from real world applications to their course of study. Colleges will benefit from faculty who bring the needs of industry to the classroom and infuse industry-validated curriculum into their educational programs.

This unique work-based learning project, managed by the California Community Colleges (CCC) Business & Entrepreneurship Sector, involves placing 20 student interns and 10 faculty externs at California defense manufacturing community consortium firms. Each college selected will receive $8,500 ($8,000 for faculty stipends plus $500 for faculty travel expenses).

Sierra College will recruit two student interns from Cybersecurity and Business Entrepreneurship programs, and two faculty mentors.  The faculty externs/coaches will act as liaisons between the California defense manufacturing community consortium companies and student interns. Faculty members will oversee recruitment of student interns, help negotiate the scope of the student internships with the companies and advise the students as they perform the internships. Students will also be encouraged to enroll in their college’s work experience/work study programs to earn college credit for the paid internships.

Learn more at: Governor’s Office DoD CADENCE Student Internship Project

CMTC Offers Shifting Gears Podcasts

The manufacturing industry is undergoing a revolution and CMTC can give you and your students as well as businesses insights through a series of podcasts. Featuring conversations from the field, Shifting Gears highlights manufacturers, consultants and industry experts from the modern world of manufacturing. These quarterly podcasts include trends, technology and experts’ perceptions to help manufacturers thrive in today’s economy. Check out these Shifting Gears Podcasts.

Partners Offer Training to Develop Manufacturing Employees

Several partnerships in the Sacramento region are preparing people, especially those who lost jobs during the COVID pandemic, to enter manufacturing careers.

The California Mobility Center (CMC) and Charles A. Jones Career & Education Center have partnered to prepare workers for manufacturing jobs through the CMC Careers Pathways Program, supported by the Sacramento COVID Relief Workforce Recovery Program. The primary focus is to assist participants with employment placement. They offer an 80-hour job readiness training, technical training, internships and job placement. Results include:

  • 297 Community Based Organization (CBO) participants
  • 285 CBO Job Readiness completers
  • 38 students enrolled in technical training at Charles A. Jones Career & Education Center
  • 8 people placed in manufacturing employment
  • 17 people placed in internships

The Charles A. Jones (CAJ) Career & Education Center and Sacramento Valley Manufacturing Alliance (SVMA) are collaborating to offer entry-level training to attract people to the manufacturing industry. Synbyo, Aerometals, Comcast, Farm Fresh 2U and Siemens are supporting the “Manufacturing Cares” program by hiring participants. So far, 12 have found employment and seven are currently interning with CMC.

Moving forward, the CAJ Career & Education Center is adding forklift and OSHA 10 safety training as stand alone courses. In addition, the 90-hour introduction to manufacturing course will be repurposed to prepare individuals to be machine operators, ready for apprenticeship training and employment programs. Learn more at Manufacturing Cares.

Parallax Offer for Mechatronics Instructors

Teach Mechatronics? Parallax Inc. is offering Propeller 2 Developer Bundles to those teaching Mechatronics to sample and provide feedback.

Parallax announced: “To support the professors with Fall 2021 course integration in mind, we’re sampling a half-dozen Propeller 2 Developer Bundles for evaluation, through March. The requirements of the program are basic: you’re a mechatronics professor; you’ll participate in one Zoom focus group meeting with other mechatronics professors in May to share ideas; and, you’ll provide us with some feedback on your interests for applications.” Send your request to the Parallax Inc. Education Hotline.

March Manufacturing Webinars Offered by Partners

CMTC and Parallax announced these webinars which may be of interest to instructors and industry partners.

March 9 – 11 AM CMTC 10 Steps to Preparing Your Manufacturing Business for a Sale

March 12 – 1 PM CMTC California Manufacturing Technology Consulting Executive Talk | by TMA BlueTech

March 16 — 10 AM CMTC How Printed Tooling, Fixtures, & Jigs Can Improve Productivity in CNC Shops

March 17 — 11 AM CMTC Quality 501: How to Become a Customer’s Premium Supplier

Mar. 23 — 2 PM Parallax and cyber.org – What’s a Microcontroller? for Python with the micro:bit v2.0 Module Part 2

March 24 — 11 AM CMTC Guidance on Cal/OSHA’s Emergency Temp. COVID-19 Standard for Manufacturers

April 21 — 11 AM CMTC Guidance on Cal/OSHA’s Emergency Temp. COVID-19 Standard for Manufacturers

Student Can Access Autodesk® Fusion 360® Works From Any Browser

Di Jin, Account Manager, Autodesk Education Experiences, Autodesk®, announced at the February Shop Talk that Autodesk® Fusion 360® is now available as a web app for all students and educators — no download required. Jin has been an amazing resource to educators during COVID, according to Jeff Briggs, Regional Director, Advanced Manufacturing, North Region. “Di attends the Shop Talk to share updates and takes educators’ questions and ideas back to the Autodesk® team,” said Briggs.
Many manufacturing instructors use Autodesk® Fusion 360®, an integrated 3D CAD, CAM, and CAE tool, to prepare students with critical skills for employment. The company learned that as many as 600,000 students across California lacked computing devices for remote instruction, according to State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tony Thurmond, at the California Department of Education.
Autodesk® announced: “In a move to promote equality of opportunity and access to technology, Autodesk is making Fusion 360 available on all devices with a modern browser. The move marks a continued push for accessibility in the Autodesk Education Community, following the widespread success of Fusion 360 for Chromebooks.”
To get started with the Fusion 360 web app, visit the Autodesk® website from any device with a keyboard (this excludes tablets and mobile phones such as iPads and iPhones), and log in using your educational account credentials. For more information, please visit the Autodesk® FAQ page.

Cordova High School Joined the February Breakfast with a Manufacturer

On February 11, 2021, Cordova High School participated in the Breakfast with a Manufacturer series, arranged by Edu2Mfg in partnership with the Sacramento Valley Manufacturing Alliance. Twenty-seven students in Faith Caplin’s advanced engineering class spent an hour virtually interacting with Mike Bell, Mechanical Engineer.  Bell has a wide range of experience as an engineer and as a faculty member at both California State University Sacramento and Sierra College.  
Bell offered the students a thorough overview of what manufacturing engineers do on the job. He explained many aspects of an engineer’s involvement in manufacturing projects. Bell also shared the wide variety of interesting experiences students might have if they embark on a manufacturing career.
When asked what skill set would benefit students most in the future, Bell said, “Have a working knowledge of software development and how software is an integral part of various technologies.”

Jan./Feb. 2021 Newsletter for Educators and Manufacturers

This issue reviews the winter Edu2Mfg Train the Trainer “Designing for Manufacturability using Fusion 360®.” Find out about student design and robotics competitions. California State University Chico announced an Advanced Manufacturing and Applied Robotics BS program and Sierra College Advanced Manufacturing courses are being offered in a hybrid format. Other seminars of interest to manufacturing instructors and industry partners were announced.

Read the Jan./Feb. 2021 Newsletter.

Best Practices for Virtual Advisory Meetings Sought

We are all familiar with inviting industry partners to in-person on advisory meetings where they can network with each other, communicate changing business needs, talk to students, tour lab spaces and engage in a lively in-person discussion on the pros and cons of changing curriculum or updating equipment. But what are you doing now? With COVID, instructors are seeking effective ways to attract manufacturing representatives to online meetings, virtually collect their insights to guide their programs and provide a valuable experience through the screen.

What has worked for you to engage industry partners and collect their insights?

How are you adapting your advisory meetings?

Please email Jeff Briggs with your thoughts and ideas so we can develop best practices to benefit everyone.

Train the Trainer Session Focused on Fusion 360®

The winter Edu2Mfg Train the Trainer “Designing for Manufacturability using Fusion 360®” session was held on January 23. Dan Frank, UC Davis Ag Manufacturing and Tim Paul, Technical Manager Fusion Education with Autodesk® presented the three and a half hour program. The 11 participants represented three California Community Colleges and eight high schools from Truckee to Sacramento as well as guests from San Diego. Below are some of the topics that were covered:

Participants in the class learned how to design for manufacturability using Fusion 360®
  • Why would I 3D print vs Machine, Weldment or Blacksmith
  • How to choose manufacturing process
  • How to estimate time (R&D manufacturing process, people, setup, machine, 3D print – allow for alternative design process with less time and design for 3D printing)
  • Technology limitations for strength and usability
  • Design to understand how support structures will affect outcome
  • Effect of features on printed outcomes (windows vs pockets, when and how to thread and Design for Machining)
  • Tool Sizes to reach into areas
  • Setup orientation
  • Risk management (time and tool/machine/work holding)
  • Parametric Design/Environment model (duplicated concepts in CAM Toolpath, risk management and design for weldment)
  • Forming and fabrication technologies
  • How do technologies effect the modeling decisions
  • Rough sketch with notes.